Next month, barring divine intervention, Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton will be named the Republican and Democratic Presidential nominees respectively. From August till November,  the American people will be caught in the full metal jacket of election season. Here’s what they, and the rest of curious, confused world can expect:

Trump

1. Smear campaigns: You think Trump was bad when he was running against Ted Cruz and John Kasich? That was pee-wee tag football compared to the NFL-level of professional smear that Trump will be aiming at the Clinton campaign. He will be careful of course, mentioning Whitewater would leave him vulnerable to that odd trend of Trump investing in real estate that suddenly goes bust. Meanwhile Benghazi, emails and even the Lewinsky Scandal will be all in Trump’s sights. In the Democratic camp, Hilary will try to maintain the high ground by only attacking Trump’s speeches, policies and anti-Presidential qualities (lack of experience, abrasive and undiplomatic demeanour). However, that could quickly change, especially if the polls stay  close. This could quickly devolve into a shit-slinging contest as opposed to a Presidential election.

Hilary- I could taste the victory

2. ‘The most unpopular election in history’: Trump and Clinton are not popular candidates- Trump has middle America in the palm of his hand but is facing an uphill battle within the party (latest update: the GOP is considering allowing convention delegates to declare a conscientious objection in place of a vote at the convention) while Hilary has the backing of the DNC but is struggling to raise support amongst voters, especially the die-hard core of the Sanders campaign, 15% of whom may actually go to back Trump after the convention.This will be an election of “who is lesser evil” and not “who is going to serve this country the best”. While both Hilary and Trump are unpopular, America feels that they either need to vote for Trump or Hilary or just not vote, because there isn’t a viable third option.

Midwest

3. The battle for the Midwest: While most regions of America have a historical political leaning, such as the southern Republican stronghold. The same can’t be said for the Midwest, a collection of states that stretches from Ohio to the Dakotas. It has swung back and forth between Democrats and Republicans but while it has been increasingly blue since 2000, Bernie won the Midwest 7 states to 5 during the primaries, which could potentially open up for a Republican spearhead, especially as a majority of the state-level governments are already Republican controlled. Both parties know this and so the Midwest will become a fierce battleground as it could be the key to an election victory.

What do you think America can expect before November? Let me know in the comments below!

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